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Nielsen's top programs for Aug. 13-19

Prime-time viewership numbers compiled by Nielsen for August 13-19. Listings include the week's ranking and viewership.

1. "America's Got Talent" (Tuesday), NBC, 11.14 million.

2. "America's Got Talent" (Wednesday), NBC, 9.86 million.

3. "60 Minutes," CBS, 6.29 million.

4. "Big Brother" (Wednesday), CBS, 5.83 million.

5. "Big Brother" (Sunday), CBS, 5.8 million.

6. "Big Brother" (Thursday), CBS, 5.73 million.

7. "The Big Bang Theory," CBS, 5.51 million.

8. "NCIS," CBS, 5.4 million.

9. "World of Dance," NBC, 5.13 million.

10. "American Ninja Warrior," NBC, 5.08 million.

11. "Young Sheldon," CBS, 4.85 million.

12. "NCIS: New Orleans," CBS, 4.76 million.

13. "Celebrity Family Feud," ABC, 4.6 million.

14. "Bachelor in Paradise" (Monday), ABC, 4.55 million.

15. "The $100,000 Pyramid," ABC, 4.54 million.

16. "America's Funniest Home Video," ABC, 4.54 million.

17. "Dateline NBC" (Monday), NBC, 4.38 million.

18. "Bull," CBS, 4.21 million.

19. "Mom," CBS, 4.12 million.

20. "Dateline NBC" (Sunday), NBC, 4.09 million

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ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co.; CBS is a division of CBS Corp.; Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox; NBC is owned by NBC Universal.

MTV arrests steep decline in its video awards show

It may have been a lousy night for Madonna at the MTV Video Music Awards, but the event offered some glimmers of hope for the network.

The Nielsen company estimated that 5.23 million watched Monday's annual tribute to what's current in popular music across several Viacom-owned networks. While that's down from the 5.68 million who watched last year, the network appears to have slowed the show's rapid decline over the past years while showing increases in digital engagement.

MTV estimated that there had been some 141.6 million video streams of content related to the awards show for the past month — including Monday night — up from 76 million a year ago. MTV said it doesn't have an estimate of how many people streamed Monday's entire show through the network's app.

Those numbers hold a greater importance for the younger viewers that MTV seeks, considering how many people experience "television" now on their devices.

Among viewers aged 18 to 34, MTV topped all other cable and broadcast numbers for the period of time that the VMAs were on, Nielsen said.

Television ratings for the awards show have been shrinking rapidly in recent years. In 2015, for example, 9.8 million watched on television. In 2011, when Katy Perry was the big winner, the show had a record viewership of 12.4 million people.

MTV moved the event from Sunday to Monday this year, which is generally a better night for the network, and closer to the middle of August so there would be less competition.

The show had its moments, including a glittery Jennifer Lopez medley. Madonna received a harsh reaction for telling a story about the late Aretha Franklin that had more to do with her than the late Queen of Soul.

The event as a whole, however, was lacking in star power, with Drake, Bruno Mars, Childish Gambino, Beyonce, Rihanna and Kendrick Lamar among the missing. If MTV can prove that it has arrested the event's decline, it may make stars more willing to show up in the future.

With a double shot of its most popular show, "America's Got Talent," NBC won the week in prime-time, averaging 4.4 million viewers. CBS had 3.6 million viewers, ABC had 3.2 million, Fox had 1.6 mullion, ION Television had 1.4 million, Telemundo had 1.2 million, Univision had 1.1 million and the CW had 800,000.

Viewers continue to find other things to do. Prime-time ratings for the four biggest networks were down by 13 percent compared to the same week last year. Two of the three cable news networks had better ratings than the Fox network.

Fox News Channel was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 2.24 million viewers in prime time, MSNBC had 1.78 million viewers, HGTV had 1.35 million, USA had 1.34 million and ESPN had 1.26 million.

ABC's "World News Tonight" led the evening newscasts with an average of 8 million viewers. NBC's "Nightly News" was second with 7.4 million viewers and the "CBS Evening News" had 5.6 million.

For the week of Aug. 13-19, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: "America's Got Talent" (Tuesday), NBC, 11.14 million; "America's Got Talent" (Wednesday), NBC, 9.86 million; "60 Minutes," CBS, 6.29 million; "Big Brother" (Wednesday), CBS, 5.83 million; "Big Brother" (Sunday), CBS, 5.8 million; "Big Brother" (Thursday), CBS, 5.73 million; "The Big Bang Theory," CBS, 5.51 million; "NCIS," CBS, 5.4 million; "World of Dance," NBC, 5.13 million; "American Ninja Warrior," NBC, 5.08 million.

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ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks.

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Online:

http://www.nielsen.com

Court says rap video was threat to police, not free speech

A rapper convicted of threatening police officers in a video posted online lost an appeal Tuesday when Pennsylvania's highest court called his lyrics "highly personalized" and ruled they were not protected by free speech rights.

The state Supreme Court turned down Jamal Knox's appeal of his conviction for witness intimidation and terroristic threats for the video that named two Pittsburgh officers.

The justices said Knox, 24, described how he intended to kill the two officers in the song.

"In this way, the lyrics are both threatening and highly personalized to the victims," wrote Chief Justice Thomas Saylor, adding that Knox spoke of when the officers' shifts ended and his plans to attack them "where you sleep."

Knox was awaiting trial when an officer found a YouTube video in 2012 of the song, which Knox argued was strictly artistic in nature and not intended as a threat to police. He denied posting it and said he did not intend it to be disseminated publicly.

Knox was facing drug charges after a chase in which he hit a parked car and a fence. Police recovered 15 bags of heroin and $1,500 on Knox and a stolen, loaded gun in the vehicle.

The song, performed under the name Mayhem Mal of the Ghetto Superstar Committee, includes the lines: "I got my Glock and best believe dog gonna bring the pump out and I'm hittin' your chest," as well as, "Let's kill these cops 'cause they don't do us no good."

The song also references Richard Poplawski, who is on death row for the 2009 murder of three Pittsburgh police officers.

The video was taken down from YouTube after three days.

Saylor said the lyrics did not amount to political, social or academic commentary and did not appear to be satire or ironic.

"Rather, they primarily portray violence toward the police, ostensibly due to the officers' interference" with his activities, Saylor wrote.

One of the officers said the video shocked him and was among the reasons he left the department and relocated, Saylor said. The other officer received additional security.

Knox's lawyer offered no immediate comment, and the Allegheny County district attorney's office declined to comment, saying the decision had not been fully reviewed.

Court won't remove judge, tells Meek Mill to appeal ruling

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has denied a motion from rapper Meek Mill to remove a Philadelphia judge from his case after she denied his request for a new trial.

The court said Tuesday Mill's attorneys must go through the regular process of appealing Judge Genece Brinkley's decision, despite their argument she'd been biased.

Mill, whose real name is Robert Rihmeek Williams, has asked that his decade-old drug and gun convictions be thrown out because of credibility issues with the officer who testified against him. His lawyers noted several other convictions involving the same officer have been thrown out by a different judge and the district attorney's office supported the request.

Mill's attorneys say they will now ask the state Superior Court to hear their appeal.

An attorney for Brinkley says the denial is "absolutely no surprise."

Tony Award-winning actress Barbara Harris dies at age 83

Barbara Harris, the Tony Award-winning actress whose comic-neurotic charms lit up the Broadway stage and helped her steal films including "Nashville," ''Freaky Friday" and "A Thousand Clowns," has died. She was 83.

Harris died early Tuesday of lung cancer in Scottsdale, Arizona, said close friend Charna Halpern, who co-founded the iO Theater in Chicago and had known Harris for decades.

Harris played the mother who switched bodies with Jodie Foster in the original "Freaky Friday" in 1976, the same year she starred in Alfred Hitchcock's final film, "Family Plot."

But it was Robert Altman's 1975 "Nashville" that would become her best-known film with her memorable performance of "It Don't Worry Me" in front of a shell-shocked crowd after the violent climax.

Harris had been in hospice care and remained restless and hilarious until the end, Halpern said.

"What am I supposed to do, just wait here and die?" Halpern remembered Harris telling one of the hospice nurses at one point. "She was just so funny and warm, in everything she did."

She was one of the performers in the historic first cast of Chicago's Second City improvisational theater, which opened its doors in late 1959. Over a half-century it has become the proving ground for dozens of now-famous actors and comedians, from Alan Arkin and John Belushi to Tina Fey and Stephen Colbert.

"The improvisations were the thing," Harris told the Los Angeles Times. "It gave you a chance to try. If you died, you really died, but it was a great way to learn."

She made her screen debut in 1965 with "A Thousand Clowns," then got back-to-back Tony nominations in 1966 and 1967 for two hit Broadway musicals, "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and "The Apple Tree." She took home the Tony for "The Apple Tree," which was directed by Mike Nichols and also starred Alan Alda.

Harris also racked up an Oscar nomination as best supporting actress in the 1971 film "Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?" It featured Harris in a memorable bit about a struggling actress who meets up with the main character, a successful but angst-ridden songwriter played by Dustin Hoffman.

While appearing in occasional regional theater productions, she concentrated mostly on film in the 1970s and '80s, when she appeared in the landmark productions of "Nashville" and "Family Plot."

She played Kathleen Turner's mother in "Peggy Sue Got Married" in 1986 and had a small role in the 1997 John Cusack film "Grosse Point Blank."

Born in 1935 in the Chicago suburb of Evanston, Harris was a veteran of two Second City predecessor groups, Playwrights Theatre Club — which she joined while still in high school — and the Compass Players, which was created amid the intellectual atmosphere of the University of Chicago.

Her Compass compatriots included Ed Asner, who was among the actors and critics celebrating Harris on Tuesday.

"Goodnight sweet lady," Asner wrote on Twitter. "You were a force."

While still with the Second City, Harris helped bring the troupe and its intellectual humor to national attention with out of town appearances in Los Angeles and, shortly thereafter, on Broadway in 1961 in a show titled "From the Second City."

In 1965's "A Thousand Clowns," she played an uptight social worker investigating the welfare of an adolescent boy being raised by his non-conformist uncle (Jason Robards) in a decidedly unorthodox way.

In classic '60s fashion, the plot hinges on the tensions between traditional society and those who question its norms. And, of course, the social worker falls in love with the uncle.

"I'm still not sure what the girl I play here is really like," Harris told The New York Times in 1964. "These scenes we're doing now, where she's a repressed social worker — that's easy. But later, when she cuts loose — well, I haven't quite figured it out yet. I'm working the character out as I go along."

In 1975 she thrived in "Nashville," Robert Altman's kaleidoscopic tale of the country music business.

"Altman is attracted to the actor who takes chances, because that's precisely what he does as a director," she told Los Angeles Times. "He has such daring. I'd rather see an Altman failure any day of the week than a safe, polished production where all the pieces fall perfectly into place. With Altman, there's always the possibility that he'll get into an area of genius."

Harris played a pathetic wannabe on the periphery of the action who in the end proves to be a truly good singer, attempting to calm a crowd that has just witnessed the on-stage shooting of a star.

"At that, and in laddered tights, she just about makes off with the film," the LA Times wrote, "adding another to her list of unforgettable presences."

Harris had no surviving family.

The Latest: Fans say they prayed for rapper on troubled jet

The Latest on a small jet that blew two tires while taking off (all times local):

5:55 p.m.

Fans of rapper Post Malone say they drove to an upstate New York airport as soon as they heard his private jet had blown two tires on takeoff from a small New Jersey airport and would be making an emergency landing there.

Teenager Dom Henry says he was "praying" for the rapper's safety and was hoping to see him.

Anthony DeStefano and his nephew watched the jet from a nearby hill. DeStefano says he saw the plane descend and it appeared to be a normal landing. He says the landing was a "great job by the pilot."

The jet had been headed to England and initially was diverted to Massachusetts. When it landed Post Malone thanked fans who prayed for him and dissed those who "wished death" on him on Twitter while he was in the air.

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4:30 p.m.

Rapper Post Malone is thanking fans for their prayers now that his private jet that blew two tires taking off from a small New Jersey airport has landed safely in New York.

In a tweet after the landing, he also disses those who "wished death" on him while he was in the air.

The Gulfstream IV landed Tuesday at New York Stewart International Airport in Newburgh, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) north of New York City. Emergency responders were ready by the runway, and fans who had gathered clapped and cheered as the plane landed safely.

The jet was headed to London Luton Airport in Luton, England, from Teterboro Airport when the pilot realized after takeoff early Tuesday that the tires had blown. It initially was diverted to Massachusetts.

Post Malone is set to perform at the Reading and Leeds Festival in England over the weekend.

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3:55 p.m.

A private jet that blew two tires during takeoff at a small New Jersey airport has landed safely at an airport in New York.

The Gulfstream IV landed Tuesday at New York Stewart International Airport in Newburgh, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) north of New York City. Emergency responders were ready by the runway.

The jet was headed to London Luton Airport in Luton, England, from Teterboro Airport when the pilot realized after takeoff early Tuesday that the tires had blown. He circled the airport for about 30 minutes before the jet was diverted.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the plane had 16 people on board.

The jet originally had been diverted to Westfield-Barnes Regional Airport in Massachusetts. It landed instead at Stewart, which has a nearly 12,000-foot (3,650-meter) runway.

Fans of rapper Post Malone gathered because they heard he was on board.

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3:20 p.m.

A small group of fans who heard rapper Post Malone was on a private jet that blew two tires during takeoff at a small New Jersey airport and was diverted has gathered at an airport in Westfield, Massachusetts, hoping to watch the jet's emergency landing.

There's been no official confirmation Post Malone and musician Andrew Watt are on the plane, which was diverted elsewhere.

Westfield-Barnes, Massachusetts, regional airport manager Eric Billowitz says the troubled Gulfstream IV is now bound for New York Stewart International Airport in Newburgh, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) north of New York City.

The plane was en route to London Luton Airport in Luton, England, when the pilot realized shortly after takeoff that the tires had blown.

Post Malone is scheduled to perform at the Reading and Leeds Festival in England over the weekend.

The face-tattooed singer/rapper took home the song of the year award at the MTV Video Music Awards Monday night.

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1:20 p.m.

A plane that blew two tires during takeoff at a small New Jersey airport has been circling over Connecticut before what authorities say will be an attempt to make an emergency landing at an airport in Massachusetts.

The Gulfstream IV jet was carrying 16 passengers when it left Teterboro Airport around 10:50 a.m. Tuesday. The pilot soon realized what had happened and began circling the airport for about 30 minutes before the jet was diverted.

The jet was headed to London Luton Airport in Luton, England. The Federal Aviation Administration says it was diverted to Westfield-Barnes Regional Airport in Westfield, Massachusetts.

Flight tracking service flightradar24.com showed the flight circling over Stamford and Bridgeport in southern Connecticut on the Long Island Sound shortly after 1 p.m.

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12:55 p.m.

Authorities say a plane that blew two tires during takeoff at a small New Jersey airport will attempt to make an emergency landing at an airport in Massachusetts.

The Gulfstream IV jet was carrying 16 passengers when it left Teterboro Airport around 10:50 a.m. Tuesday. The pilot soon realized what had happened and began circling the airport for about 30 minutes before the jet was diverted.

The jet was headed to London Luton Airport in Luton, England. The Federal Aviation Administration says it was diverted to Westfield-Barnes Regional Airport in Westfield, Massachusetts.

Rapper Post Malone's jet blows 2 tires but then lands safely

A private jet carrying rapper Post Malone blew two tires during takeoff at a small New Jersey airport on Tuesday but made a safe emergency landing hours later in upstate New York, prompting the rapper to thank fans who prayed for him and diss those who "wished death" on him while he was in the air.

The face-tattooed singer/rapper, who had been headed to England, tweeted, "i landed guys."

"Oh, my God, I hate flying in general. I don't even know what to say, man. I'm shook," he told the celebrity website TMZ on Facetime. "There was one hell of a team on that aircraft, and we're here, we're here on earth, and I need a beer, and I need some wine, at the same time, mixed together."

The plane had 16 people on board when it left Teterboro Airport on Tuesday morning, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Fans gathered at New York Stewart International Airport in Newburgh, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) north of New York City, after hearing the rapper was on board, and they cheered when the plane landed just before 4 p.m. The rapper was scheduled to perform at the Reading and Leeds Festival in England over the weekend, according to his website's tour schedule.

"thank you for your prayers," he posted on Twitter after Tuesday's emergency landing. "can't believe how many people wished death on me on this website."

The troubled Gulfstream IV was en route from Teterboro to London Luton Airport in Luton, England, when the pilot realized shortly after takeoff that the tires had blown. The pilot circled the airport for about 30 minutes before the jet was diverted.

The plane originally was to attempt an emergency landing at Westfield-Barnes Regional Airport in Massachusetts, airport manager Eric Billowitz said. It circled over Connecticut to burn fuel, a practice sometimes used to decrease the risk of explosion and fire during emergency landings.

Post Malone had been in the New York area on Monday for the MTV Video Music Awards, where he won the song of the year prize.

A small group of the curious and fans who had heard he was on the plane on Tuesday initially gathered at the airport in Westfield, Massachusetts, hoping to watch the landing.

"We came down because he had the biggest day of his life yesterday and we wanted to make sure he is safe," said Jessica Kielb, of Chicopee, Massachusetts.

Dom Henry drove to the New York airport with friends as soon as he heard the plane would be landing there instead. He was one of several fans, mostly teenagers, who anxiously waited for the plane behind the chain link fence surrounding the runway.

"I was praying," he said.

Asked whether he was praying for Post Malone's safety, he said, "Yeah, of course. And to see him."

Anthony DeStefano saw the plane descend and said it appeared to have a normal landing, with no unusual noise or other indications of a problem. DeStefano, a local teacher, acknowledged being unfamiliar with Post Malone until his nephew informed him.

"Great job by the pilot," DeStefano said. "People started clapping as soon as it landed."

Billowitz said he was told the plane was first headed to the Massachusetts airport because there is a Gulfstream service center there and because the airport has "one of the longest runways in the Northeast" at 9,000 feet (2,740 meters), but the plane was then diverted to Stewart.

Stewart's signature feature is a nearly 12,000-foot (3,650-meter) runway, long enough to handle the fat-bodied C-5A Galaxy planes laden with supplies and better for such emergencies.

Post Malone took home the song of the year award at the VMAs for his hit "Rockstar," featuring 21 Savage. The song is from his latest album, "Beerbongs & Bentleys."

The 23-year-old was joined on stage by rockers Aerosmith and 21 Savage for a wild performance that closed out the awards show.

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Associated Press writers David Porter in Newark, New Jersey, and Pat Eaton-Robb in Westfield, Massachusetts, contributed to this report.

Actor Adam Driver says he had KKK neighbors in Indiana

"Star Wars" actor Adam Driver is bringing his northern Indiana hometown's hate group history to light after saying Ku Klux Klan rallies were frequent during his childhood and that some of his neighbors were Klan members.

The Mishawaka native made the comments during a USA Today interview about his role in the new movie "BlacKkKlansman," the Indianapolis Star reported .

"If anything, I was more aware of it as a kid growing up in Indiana, because there were always Klan rallies, like, every summer," Driver, 34, told USA Today. "There were people in the Klan who were in our neighborhood."

Indiana University professor emeritus James Madison said he doesn't doubt that Driver was exposed to the KKK but doubts he saw many, if any, rallies.

"Most of the memories of this sort tend to be grossly exaggerated, but at the same time, it's quite possible that he saw men and women in robes and sheets," said Madison, who is writing a book about the Indiana Klan. "It's quite possible that he saw a burning cross. But not a lot of it."

Driver's representatives didn't return the newspaper's messages for comment.

There was a KKK rally in nearby South Bend around 2001, when Driver was a teenager, according to a report by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Indiana Grand Dragon Richard Loy was also known at the time to host rallies on his Osceola farm about 10 minutes east of Mishawaka, according to the Washington Post.

The KKK had a tight grip on Indiana in the 1920s. Historians estimate that nearly a third of Indiana's native-born white Protestant men were members at one point, Madison said.

More than 30 hate groups operate in the state today, with three them affiliated with the Klan, according to the SPLC. The KKK has a waning presence in Indiana, but there are many other groups gaining support in its place, said Heidi Beirich, director of the center's Intelligence Project.

"There's research that's been done, that a history of hate groups — going all the way back to the '20s Klan — also lasts through history, and you see more hate groups in places like that," she said. "History plays a role here."

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Information from: The Indianapolis Star, http://www.indystar.com

Lawmakers want Congressional Gold Medal for Aretha Franklin

A bipartisan group of House and Senate lawmakers is introducing legislation to honor Aretha Franklin posthumously with the Congressional Gold Medal.

The "Queen of Soul," who died last week at 76, "instilled hope, uplifted generations, and changed the lives of millions," according to the bill introduced Tuesday by Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris of California and Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah. They were joined by Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, a Republican, Democratic Rep. Brenda Lawrence of Michigan and the senators from her home state of Tennessee.

Harris called Franklin's songs "the soundtrack of my childhood."

Hatch said she "touched the hearts of millions, lifting all of us with songs of hope and humanity."

The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest commendation from Congress and was first awarded to George Washington.

Danny Boyle departs James Bond over 'creative differences'

The next James Bond movie has lost its director.

Bond producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, along with star Daniel Craig, announced Tuesday that Danny Boyle has exited the project over "creative differences." Boyle, the director of "Slumdog Millionaire" and "Trainspotting," earlier this year confirmed that he would direct the 25th 007 film. Boyle and his regular collaborator John Hodge were working on the script.

Production on the film, often referred to as "Bond 25," was to begin in December. The movie is to be Craig's fifth outing as James Bond, though endless speculation on his successor has been ongoing. Most recently, Idris Elba alluded to rumors of his casting by tweeting "Elba. Idris Elba."

The 25th Bond film is scheduled for U.S. release on Nov. 8 next year.

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